Tuesday, 22 November 2011

Hyde Park, garden

The remnants of a heritage listed underground public toilet is located at Hyde Park, along Park Street close to the corner of Elizabeth Street. Built in 1909, it has now been dicommissioned and filled with sand, which preserves it and allows for reuse in the future. The features above ground such as the the lamp post on a sandstone plinth and wrought iron stairway fences have been incorporated into the garden beds.

30 comments:

  1. Lots of recycling going on here...I like it...the garden photo is lovely!

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  2. Looks beautiful. I envy your time of year right now.

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  3. interesting!

    thanks for stopping by my blog and leaving a comment this weekend! really appreciate it! blessings to you from Texas!

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  4. That is the corner for my 389 bus, Jim. I have always found it to be immensely confusing. I would love to see x-ray shots of what is under Hyde Park. The most wondrous series of tunnels and structures ... just in case.

    Here, as in many other situations, the surface hides a multitude of 'sins' ...

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  5. Hyde Park in Sydney is one of my favourite spots. Good photo of this little corner hiding much (as all parks and gardens do!)

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  6. Amazing story!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

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  7. What an interesting story and who would have thought!! I love it! Terrific post/photo as always, Jim! Hope you have a great weekend!

    Sylvia

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  8. Recycling is good! It's sometimes a pity to demolish old buildings and replace them by ugly new ones. This public toilet must have been interesting enough to save it.

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  9. Whoever might have thought of reusing to this extent?! You have a keen eye for such hidden constructions, great shot:)

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  10. Looks like an interesting place and what a story. Great photo, have a wonderful week!

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  11. I've never seen it but your picture tells a story...and that's just brilliant!

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  12. Preserves it and allows it to be used again in the future? You're having us on, Jim, aren't you?
    A very pretty photo, however.

    Kay, Alberta, Canada
    An Unfittie’s Guide to Adventurous Travel

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  13. That's an interesting way to conserve a site. Thanks for teaching me something!

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  14. Kay, I guess they were thinking that someone might come up with an interesting new use for them in the future. So just in case, they didn't want to destroy this piece of history.

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  15. How very fascinating Jim, I think it's incredibly exciting to thing that one day they could be brought back to life again, even if only for interest sake. I wish I'd know all this before I walked by last week, would have checked it out a little closer. Great post.

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  16. I'm glad this feature was preserved...it is very beautiful.

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  17. Nice park! And an interesting history.

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  18. I am glad the wrought iron stairway fences have not been pulled down. As the garden grows, the fences will be more and more incorporated into the garden beds.

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  19. Filled with sand, that's an interesting snippet of info.

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  20. Great shot Jim!
    Greetings from Holland,
    Anna :-))

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  21. That's a beautiful garden and very interesting story.

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  22. Great shots, and I bet the architecture down there would be interesting too-minus the sand LOL:)

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