Thursday, 2 December 2010

Gordon, school

The old Gordon Public School, located on the Pacific Highway in the northern suburb of Gordon. A school opened here in 1871 and closed in 1989. This sandstone building was designed by George Mansfield in the Gothic Revival style and constructed in 1878, with a second block added in 1912. It now houses a small museum known as the Headmaster’s Office Museum, the Ku-ring-gai Historical Society Research Centre and the Gordon Library Meeting Rooms.

24 comments:

  1. First time I've seen a school built out of sandstone. Lovely colors.

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  2. I love the photos of the school. Just lovely. Happy Outdoor Wednesday.

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  3. But it is not used as a school anymore, is it? Is this the one opposite the council chambers? I have vague memories of going in their for the historical society meeting when I used to live up that way.

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  4. Thanks for the heads up, Julie. I did some research on the historical society and confirmed it is part of the local library now and is also used as a museum. I have added some info and links.

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  5. Filip, this school was the oldest one in the suburb and had limited space. There is a Gordon East Public School and a Gordon West Public School in this suburb. They probably increased capacity at the other schools to accommodate the students and cut costs by shutting the third school in the area.

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  6. It's beautiful! Your photos of it are just wonderful.

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  7. Such strength and beauty in those sandstone walls.

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  8. I love to see photos of these old school buildings ~ the use of lovely sandstone is so soft and reminds me of my school-days.
    xx
    Dianne

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  9. Ann, this suburb was named to commemorate Sir James Willoughby Gordon, the quartermaster-general in England when the First Fleet sailed to Botany Bay. It was named by General Sir Thomas Mitchell who had served with him during the Peninsular War.

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  10. Great old building. Glad that it is still used.

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  11. It is a handsome building to have outgrown its usefulness in only 18 years. The area must have grown faster than expected. Tulsa is like that. many nice public buildings built before the oil boom were replaced in only 10 years. I enjoy your blog.

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  12. Tulsa Gentleman, it was actually part of the original school for 118 years.

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  13. I'm glad it is being used and not abandoned or torn down. An interesting building. I appreciate the bits of history you provide with your lovely pictures.

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